St. Simons Wedding Planner :: Island Destination Weddings | color
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Details: Godiva Chocoiste in Tokyo

interior-design-Godiva

Another fantastic example of great coloring and lighting!  The Godiva store in the Harajuku district designed by the interior design firm Wonderwall is absolutely gorgeous with the “melting” walls.  Another great way of involving your design into the experience!

interior-design-Godiva

Details: Flowers at the White House

 

decorating-ideas-white-house-flowers

I simply adore the coloring in this room!  Look at the rich teal walls, complemented by the lush greenery in the high arrangements.  The pop of color against the chartreuse linens in the purple florals  (by Laura Dowling of Intérieurs et Fleurs) and glasses.  Very simple, yet colorful elements that add definition and personality.  Take note of the tall tapers (stunning)!  Just a powerful point that lighting—both uplighting and candlelight can do wonders for the appearance of your event.

Color Fabulous: Macaw Green

macaw-green

 

 green button crysanthemum pomander with pearl pins

Adorable green button crysanthemum pomander ball with pearl pins

 wedding bouquet with burgundy dahlias, chocolate cosmos, chocolate scabiosa, Queen Anne's lace and lilies of the valley

This bouquet with burgundy dahlias, chocolate cosmos, chocolate scabiosa, Queen Anne’s lace and lilies of the valley and its green ribbon enhances the mint and oregano. Bardin Paloma via Brides.com

Tall centerpieces of hydrangeas and oncidium orchids and kower centerpieces of peonies, hyacinths, hydrangeas and roses,

Tall centerpieces of hydrangeas and oncidium orchids and kower centerpieces of peonies, hyacinths, hydrangeas and roses by Floris Special Events via Brides.com. 

 

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monkey tail, kumquat, poppy and eucalyptus pods wrapped in horsetail bamboo

 

Boutonniere of monkey tail, kumquat, poppy and eucalyptus pods wrapped in horsetail bamboo by A Simple Ceremony via Brides.com. 

 

Green pocketfold wedding invitation

Invitation #215 from Stephita’s Japanese collection

 

Modern Bloom wedding invitation  in Kelly and Black by I Do Design

Modern Bloom wedding invitation  in Kelly and Black by I Do Design

 

Strapless A-line tea-length dress. Gathered sweetheart neckline at front and back. Style No. 5853  by Jim Hjelm Occasions image

Style No. 5853  by Jim Hjelm Occasions

 

Style No. 502  green ruffle empire knee length bridesmaids dress by Bari Jay Green ruffled empire cut bridesmaids dress by Bari Jay

Style No. 502 by Bari Jay (the gold accents and red nails are divine)

 

wedding cake with green bow and jewels by Pink Cake Box

Cake by Pink Cake Box

white wedding cake with green hydrangea and satin ribbon and dots

Cake by Cake America

 

Jessica Elliot gold diamond Istanbul pendant with green ename

Jessica Elliot gold diamond Istanbul pendant with green enamel at Max and Chloe

 

14k White Gold Green Amethyst Earrings

The serene color of cushion-cut green amethyst pairs perfectly with sparkling round-cut diamonds on elegant 14k white gold earrings at Macy’s

Event Vision 101: Color

eventvision101

Color is life.

 

Color is life’s method of non-verbal communication, with symbolism and meaning.

 

You could choose colors because they have a deep meaning for you or just because they are pretty.  However, choosing colors for your wedding will be a very important choice and will dictate the design of the event vision.  Color means different things to different people and cultures.  If you plan on incorporating traditions that reflect your heritage, take notice as to what colors are prominent and meaningful.

 

Let’s discuss color basics:

 

 color wheel

 

Contrasting/Clashing Colors—despite the name, working with these colors doesn’t necessarily cause an eyesore.  They are called this because they sit across from each other on the color wheel.  This can create a very dynamic color combination with depth and contrast.

Complementary Colors—On the color wheel, these colors are separated by another color.  When paired together, it is said that they can cause an undesired “visual vibration”, however when integrated with another color, they can complement each other well…hence the name.

Adjacent/Harmonizing Colors—These colors lie right next to each other on the color wheel. Even though they harmonize well together, there may appear washed out as there is not be enough contrast. 

 

 

Because of the varying shades and tints of all the colors on the wheel, you can achieve a very personal look.  Pick your colors from something you love already—a dress, photography, floral arrangement, etc.  Select three colors—light, medium and dark.  These colors could be found in anything and doesn’t necessarily be something that you introduce, but something to play off of in your design.  Just remember—light recedes, darker draws in.  Be sure to distribute the color evenly—this can be done with centerpieces, linens, lighting, present colors at your venue or in nature.  In design, using contrasting/clashing colors creates a more formal feel, while using adjacent/harmonizing colors can create a casual feel. On that same token, you are more likely to have more dimension and depth when using contrasting colors.  For easier selection, go to stores like Home Depot or Sherwin Williams for paint samples, where you can play with various colors.  To stay up with colors that are hot and in season, check out the Pantone color trends.  Be sure not to go overboard with “trendy” colors; it can cause your design to look very dated in years to come.

 

Remember that you want your color to invoke a feeling that is congruent to the event experience you want to create.  Will your vision be alluring and seductive or playful and demure?  Do you want your colors to be energizing or tranquil?